SANKOFA 90

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divalocity:

Because of Them…They Can: Thank You Bethann and Iman and those before them who paved the way. We Speak Your Names!

Photos: Getty Images

(via lamusenoire)

Laurence Chavin Buthaud

Laurence Airline

The art of Kadir Nelson.

(via cultureunseen)

(via dynamicafrica)

lamusenoire:

HITCHED: Aaron Barker and Cipriana Quann for VOGUE.COM

Photo: Philippe Jarrigeon

Fashion Editor: Felicia Garcia-Rivera

Hair: Wesley O’Meara

Makeup: Georgi Sandev

(Source : Vogue)

sronko:

Banku with Grilled Tilapia and some green and red pepper Yummy ;). Bought at a local food spot in Ghana.

(Source : soronkomeals, via ghanailoveyou)

curly-essence:

Ayesha

(via blackfashion)

Maya Angelou on Courage and Creativity.

SHE WILL RISE

(Source : vintageblackglamour, via naturalbelle)

art21:

"I don’t think that my work is actually effectively dealing with history. I think of my work as subsumed by history or consumed by history." —Kara Walker

(Source : art21.org, via blackfashion)

dynamicafrica:

“Your perceptions become your reality” by Nikissi Serumaga-Jamo.

Am I Going Too Fast? is a poetic documentary filmed in Nakuru and Nairobi, Kenya by Hank Willis Thomas and Christopher Myers. As successful applicants of the Sundance Institute Short Film Challenge, it was one of 5 short films to receive a $10,000 prize and premiere at a private event at Sundance.

acsual:

Tate Britain present: Migrations: Journeys into British Art

An exhibition which explores British art through the theme of migration from 1500 to present day. Frank Bowling , O.B.E., RA, who is the first Black artist elected as a Royal Academician, features as part of this seven month exhibition. A must see for creatives curious about the progression of the nations art.

Migrations: Journeys into British Art, until 12 August 2012

Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

£6, concessions available, Tate members go free

For more info:

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/migrations

(via blackcontemporaryart)

“ Beyoncé has to be understood not only
as a glorious diva but as propaganda for a race-free society ”

—    Cashmore, Celebrity culture